text editor migration saga 

I used vscodium for a day earlier this week and was impressed – very similar to atom, and very sleek including ultra-easy package installation. But couldn't quite shake my annoyance at being ushered further into microsoft-world or paranoia that they'll next shuttle everyone into a cloud version. (I know it's open source and could be forked, as could atom, but at this point I've seen how easy it is for an original maintainer to take the wind out of a project's sails.)

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text editor migration saga 

So I gave doom-emacs a 2nd try, and that might have done it. Config is frankly more of a hassle than it needs to be, IMO – the doom docs in particular are sprawling and inconsistent, with a voice that's unfriendly to newcomers – but I've got it to a point where I have an extremely uncluttered UI with all the main elements I want. Turning off evil-mode helped me, but I'm definitely starting to grasp the appeal of not relying on a mouse.

text editor migration saga 

still not loving emacs. thought about going the opposite direction: less reliance on editor features and more on os/utilities. learned about gedit's external tools plugin, which lets you pin bash commands to keyboard shortcuts. this seems pretty ideal – I'd way rather re-implement my atom packages as bash scripts than as elisp (both for familiarity and portability). BUT...

text editor migration saga 

Gnome seems to be switching from gedit to the new Gnome Text Editor. The former's future seems iffy. The latter looks beautiful and has great markdown support, but its devs are explicitly opposed to re-implementing external tools (reddit.com/r/gnome/comments/st). This is a bummer, as Gnome Builder (where they figure users wanting any advanced features will go) has far too much IDE stuff for a non-code writing workflow.

text editor migration saga 

@akstuhl cool to see that other people are also using doom-emacs here :) I really like it, and most of the key combinations have already migrated into my muscle memory. The only thing that I have struggled with is auto-completion in different code projects, especially php. do you have any experience with that?

text editor migration saga 

@faebser neat! I ended up turning the default completion package (company) off because the instructions for disabling it in a given mode didn't work. I'm mainly doing non-code writing these days, but I start little javascript hobby projects often enough that I would like to figure out how to selectively re-enable auto-completion. what's your experience/struggle been with it?

text editor migration saga 

@akstuhl How's it been going so far? You're slowly convincing me to switch over to Doom Emacs (though i think I'd keep evil mode on after learning a little bit of vim lately).

I'm also curious to hear what you find appealing about not relying on a mouse.

text editor migration saga 

@cj Starting to find it more intuitive and enjoyable. I think Doom does a good job of providing a curated set of packages toward being readily able to get an atom- or vs-like setup, which was a needed on-ramp in my case. I don't know how much advantage it'd have over vanilla if you're already adept with Emacs and have a config / package set you like. But it is fairly opinionated toward evil-mode, interestingly.

text editor migration saga 

@akstuhl You're not alone — I've been moving away from emacs myself to using OS utilities in the terminal like vim (actually Neovim), tmux, screen, etc.

It's almost like trying to cultivate a sort of digital "living off the land" approach —not so much attach yourself to one application but to a flexible practice.

But of course building custom configs on these OS tools can lock you in just like an application...gah! Definitely a difficult balance.

text editor migration saga 

@cj That's a great way of putting it. I'm not ready to go GUI-less, but I'd really like to rely on several smaller, sturdy but swappable tools rather than one all-encompassing tool. My big reservation with emacs was that I don't want to learn a new operating system – I just want a good text editor that interacts well with other stuff. I'm actually now finding gedit does pretty much exactly what I want with very straightforward/reusable config.

text editor migration saga 

@akstuhl Yeah I totally get it with just wanting a good interoperable text editor. The scripting feature of gedit looks _really_ cool — I love the idea of using a bash script attached to a keyboard shortcut to like, add a date or manipulate text in a certain way.

Looking forward to see how you use the scripting feature more! (just saw you share the Zotero one which looks quite useful)

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